july 2011 programmes

 

saturday 2 july
6.30 pm “Rock, Poetry and Acoustics”
(not necessarily in that order) by ‘Mending Iris’  

friday 8th july
6.30 pm “Indian Classical Vocal Recital” by Dilip Kumar Maity
 

saturday 9th july
1 to 2 pm Food Meditation # 15
 

tuesday 12th july
6 pm
The Gilgamesh Epic: A Window into the Civilization of Mesopotamia
An illustrated talk  by Shereen Ratnagar

AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES, ANNEXE BUILDING, JANPATH

saturday 16th july
6.30 pm “W
elcoming the monsoon” sarod recital by Pritam Ghoshal 

saturday 23rd july
6.30 pm “'KATHAK-KATHAK” a recital by Monisa Nayak

 

 

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saturday 2 july
6.30 pm “Rock, Poetry and Acoustics”
(not necessarily in that order) by ‘Mending Iris’  

Fusion in Indian music started in the mid fifties with elements of Ali Akbar Khan and Ravi Shankar’s music influencing American Rock and Roll and later American Jazz. George Harrison of the Beatles played ‘Norwegian Wood’ on the Sitar in the mid sixties and Miles Davis started performing with Indian musicians. The Rolling Stones, The Grateful Dead and Incredible String Band soon integrated Indian influences and instruments into their music.  

This evening a group of young Indian musicians fuse not only musical traditions but performance styles. Using poetry, Indian percussion instruments (shakers, payal, tambourine, tabla) and Guitars they will perform an interesting mix of Rock and Roll, Indian percussion and Poetry reading.

This evening a group of young Indian musicians fuse not only musical traditions but performance styles. Using poetry, Indian percussion instruments (shakers, payal, tambourine, tabla) and Guitars they will perform an interesting mix of Rock and Roll, Indian percussion and Poetry reading.      

Mending Iris was formed in 2006 as a jam band, and grew to be rock n roll songwriters on life and everything. The band's music is a meld of modern and classic hard rock and roll genre. The band's sound is free from any constraints and all musicians just attempt at making pure melodic rock music. 

Band:  Kukubh Megwal - Guitars, Mayank Sharma - Bass Guitar, Anirudh Choudhary - Vocals, Karan Sharma- Tabla, Soumya Mukerji - Poetry recital

 . http://www.myspace.com/mendingiris

     

 

friday 8th july
6.30 pm “Indian Classical Vocal Recital” by Dilip Kumar Maity

Dilip Maity is a musician of the Indore gharana. A graduate in Commerce, he also studied music under Acharya Usharanjan Mukhopadhyay (a disciple of the famous Ustad Amir Khan). He has been singing Hindustani classical music for over 30 years specially in the tradition of khayal, thumri, dadra, ragpradhan and bhajan.  

He has participated in various music conferences and concerts all over the country – Kolkata, Haldia, Delhi (IIC and Habitat Centre) and concerts organized by EZCC (Ministry of Culture). He has also preformed abroad in Bangladesh, the Nehru Centre in London, Germany and Denmark as well as a tour in the US. 

 

Musicians:
Pradeep Bag - tabla
Arif Ali Klhan - harmonium

  

saturday 9th july
1 to 2 pm Food Meditation # 15 

The Food Meditation sessions continue with Anaam and The Attic. This time with an unusual vegetable dish and a 5 grain roti as well as a 5 grain bread.  

 

Menu

  • 5 grain roti & bread - jau (oats), jowar (barley), bajra (millet), atta (whole wheat),  makki (corn)
  • Makki Korma (corn and veg curry)
  • Pahari aloo with jakhia (Mountain potatoes with village seasoning)
  • Brown Rice
  • Jal jeera (refreshing summer drink made with water, cumin and mint)
                                                        Fresh Fruit

 Maize or Corn (in English speaking countries) is a grain, commonly classified as a vegetable yet is technically a fruit.  It was domesticated by the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica in prehistoric times and cultivated by the Olmec and Mayans in Mexico. It is now one of the most important commercial crops of the Americas used as a staple food grain, made into corn syrup and increasingly used as a bio fuel.

Corn came to India with the Portuguese in the 16th century and is a staple in many areas of the country. Even though only 4 centuries old in India it is an essential of Punjabi rural cuisine as ‘makki di roti’ eaten with ‘sarson da saag’. The recipe for this afternoons ‘Makki & Veg. Korma’ is provided by ‘mina di mummy’.

MAKKI & VEG. KORMA 

Ingredients:

1/2 cup corn
½ cup mixed veg chopped small (carrot, capsicum, beans, potato)
2 tbsp. oil
2 chopped onions
3-4 black cardamoms (moti elaichi)
2 chopped  tomatoes
1 cup beaten curd
1 tsp. red chilli powder
1 tsp each ginger and garlic paste
1/4 tsp. turmeric powder (haldi)
2 chopped green chillies 
salt to taste

 

Preparation:
Pressure cook the corn (about 10 mins) and steam the veg (about 1 minute)
Heat oil, brown lightly the ginger & garlic paste.
Saute onions & put tomatoes. Cook about 2 minutes.
Add all the spices and green chillies.
Put curd and add the veg. Cook for 10 minutes.
Put water and cook for another 5 minutes.
 

Corn is a good source of many nutrients including thiamin (vitamin B1), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), folate, (for cardiovascular health) dietary fiber, vitamin C, phosphorus and manganese.  

5 grain roti – even though whole wheat is an excellent food the addition of the other grains adds interest, variety and vitamins to everyday foods.  

As usual the food will be eaten in silence to encourage concentration on the conscious eating of the food. Discussion afterwards, if required.

 

Participation is by registration on payment only. Call The Attic 23746050 or email:  mina@theatticdelhi.org.
Charges:  Rs 100.

 

 

Ancient Civilizations 

This Series of 12 lectures on the ancient civilizations of the world will be held at the National Archives over a 12 month period in collaboration with National Archives and UNESCO. 

Eminent Indian and foreign scholars will cover aspects of ancient India and the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Mesopotamian and other ancient cultures. 

In the last 20 years many developments have taken place in the study of ancient civilizations. DNA, carbon dating and linguistic as well as reinterpretation of existing evidence by a new generation of scholars have overturned our dearly held beliefs of Aryan invasions and/or immigrations and point to a much older, indigenous civilization than previously thought.  

The Vedic Tradition probably influenced Egypt and Mesopotamia, the spread of Buddhism influenced cultural developments in S.E Asia, Tibet, China and Japan. Vedic Sanskrit still influences the Indo European cultures all over the world.  

This series introduces the views of newer scholars in the field with thought provoking, sometimes revolutionary ideas on our common past.

 

  

tuesday 12th july
6 pm
The Gilgamesh Epic: A Window into the Civilization of Mesopotamia
An illustrated talk by Shereen Ratnagar

AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES, ANNEXE BUILDING, JANPATH

 

                                  Mesopotamia encompasses the land between the Euphrates and Tigris rivers,  widely considered to be the cradle of civilization. From the beginning of written history (c. 3100 BC) to the fall of Babylon in 539 BC, when it was conquered by the Achaemenid Empire, Mesopotamia was populated by the indigenous Sumerians and the immigrant Akkadians (including Assyrians and Babylonians), and after 1000 BC  the immigrant Aramaeans with historically important cities such as Uruk, Nineveh and Babylon. It fell to Alexander the Great in 332 BC and after his death it became part of the Greek Seleucid Empire.With the establishment of the Caliphate in the 6th century modern day Iraq, Syria, Turkey and Iran occupy portions of this area.

Gilgamesh, king of the city-state of Uruk, ruled in and around that time when the state and kingship emerged in southern Mesopotamia, the “urban revolution” unraveled, and writing was invented. Epics tend to reflect periods

when societies underwent radical change, and their protagonists tend to be heroic figures. Giving Gilgamesh’s story in a nutshell, the talk will also afford a glimpse of some archaeological remains of his time, a truly momentous period. 

The text of the Gilgamesh Epic developed from the 3rd millennium BC to the late 1st millennium BC, when it became standardized. Over this time the narrative acquired new elements. Ancient epics also reflect their oral roots, and in readings of brief extracts, the talk will indicate the marks of orality and a few signs of the poetic craft. An important feature of the Mesopotamian civilization is the tradition of scribal schools that nurtured its literature for more than two thousand years and carried it to distant lands.

There is no known image of Gilgamesh, who may have ruled around 3000 BC. We have attached here a picture of the bronze head of Sargon (2370 BC), whose imperial exploits are reflected in one section of the epic. 

 Shereen Ratnagar took postgraduate courses in the archaeology of India and of Mesopotamia in the universities of Pune and London respectively. After that she spent a year in Iraq.   She then wrote a PhD on trade connections between the two civilizations at the JNU, Delhi. She taught for several years at the JNU and is now an independent researcher working out of Mumbai.

 saturday 16th july
6.30 pm “W
elcoming the monsoon” sarod recital by Pritam Ghoshal

Athur Hussain – tabla player
 

India’s Monsoon rains have been a source of inspiration for her music, art, dance and even food. They have been the throbbing heart of Indian culture. Painters, dancers, poets, writers, cooks and especially musicians have used the imagery of the dark clouds racing across the sky, the ‘goodly smell of rain’ on the parched earth, the insistent mating call of the peacock, joyful romances after long separations and the monsoon ragas that were supposed to bring on the rains when heard by the gods.  

Mian Tansen, one of North India’s greatest musicians   recognized six basic Ragas of Hindustani music among which was Megh which he described in his own words, "Raga Megh manifests itself when the rain clouds crowd the sky.” Besides Tansens own compositions on this theme Megh, Megh Malhar and Mian ka Malhar there were other compositions by another famous musician of the time Surdas, ‘Sur Malhar’ resulting in the golden age of monsoon ragas with Madhu Malhar, Mishra Mel Malhar, and Dhulia Malhar and of course the more gentle Goud Malhar and several varieties of Malkauns, Sarang and other ragas which were specific to the Monsoon.    

Pritam Ghoshal comes from a musical family. His grandfather Jaharlal Ghoshal was both a percussionist and a singer. His father is a violinist, one uncle a tabla player and another a singer. Pritam started his musical training as a vocalist but switched to the Sarod under the guidance of Pranab Naha and then his current Guru, Ustad Amjad Ali Khan. 

 Pritam has performed in Kolkata , Mumbai, and Delhi as well as in Switzerland, Italy and Germany, Belgium and in Iran. He has composed music for a dance choreography at the ICCR Malhar festival ad participated in a unique collaboration among three dance forms, Indian Kathak, Turkish Belly Dance and Spanish Flamenco in Hanover, Germany.

 

saturday 23rd july
6.30 pm “'KATHAK-KATHAK” a recital by Monisa Nayak
 

Kathak dance, like poetry, music and sculpture, seeks to communicate universal, impersonal emotions. The themes which the Kathak dancer portrays are not only the raw material of literature, but are also the finished products of literary creation; the music which seems to accompany the dance is actually the life-breath of its structure and, indeed, dance interprets in movement what music interprets in sound.

A Kathak presentation is not bound to appear as a series of separate numbers. Our rhythm is cyclic. It not merely rises from, but reflows to the first beat, completing a round (aavartan) and making the beat in question (sama) seem clearly central. This cyclic rhythm resembles the cyclic pattern of a ‘day’ where the Sun (Surya) seems to be the focal point (sama). The starting Invocation symbolizing the early morning sunrise (taal-nritya) as energetic noon, the ‘Tirbat’ depicting the heroine (nayika), waiting for her beloved during sunset, and then the intense abhinaya (dramatic expression) on Thumri catching the stillness of night.

KATHA-KATHAK’ is a depiction of moods of these rhythmic cycles of  this classical dance form and the different Ragas of Hindustani Music. These depend upon the divisions of a day into eight time cycles ‘praharas’ (time cycles). Stated times of the night and day are assigned to particular Ragas, according to a design which might suggest a psycho-physiological basis. The word Raga (colouring), with reference to music implies   a means to ‘colour’ or influence the mind with a definite emotive response and to inflame it with a certain passion. This presentation is a beautiful synthesis of rhythm and melody. 

Monisa is an accomplished Kathak performer of the Jaipur Gharana. Her excellent command of rhythm and natural flair for profound expression, mark her performances and are critically acclaimed by connoisseurs. A disciple of Pandit Rajendra Gangani, and a Post graduate from The Kathak Kendra, she is an A Grade artiste of Delhi Doordarshan and an empanelled artiste of ICCR. 

She has performed widely in major festivals within and outside the country, both as a soloist and as an important member of renowned groups. The Malhaar Festival of ICCR, Nirat, New Delhi, Taj Mahotsav, Agra, Kalakshetra Kathak Festival, Chennai, Shivratri Mahotsava, Varanasi, Kerala Kalamandalam and Doordarshan’s National Programme of Dance are some of her more notable performances within India. Her overseas performances include Sankriti, a collage of five styles at the Lincoln Centre, New York, Allegro Vivo-Internationales Festival, Austria; Tropentheatre, Holland, the Geneva Festival, tours in the Middle East, UK, Italy, South East Asia as well as in Germany and Venezuela. 

Her choreographic works have been featured at important national and international  festivals. She has also combined her dance experimentally with other art forms like fashion design, retaining, all through, its classical vocabulary. She has been awarded the Bismillah Khan Yuva Puraskar, the Sanatana Nritya Puraskar and the Sangeet Kala Ratna.  

Monisa is a teacher at the Gandharva Mahavidyalaya, New Delhi. 

CONCEPT, CHOREOGRAPHY & PRESENTATION : MONISA NAYAK