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                                                                                 august 2011 programmes

 

august 6 saturday
6.30 pm “Sitar Melody” a sitar recital by Subho Chakraborty
with
Shubhas Kanti Das - tabla 

tuesday 9th august
6.30 pm “Depression - the commonest major illness in the world” a talk by Dr Sanjay Chugh 

friday 19 august
6.30 pm ‘Ghazals from Hyderabad’ by Anjali Gopalakrishnan  

august 20th saturday 
6.30 pm “Parithranam – the liberation” a Bharatanatyam performance by Renuka Iyer
 

sunday 21st august
1 to 2 pm Food Meditation # 16
 

thursday 25th august
6 pm "The Origins of Early Greece: the Cretan Phase" by Dr Bharat Gupt 

AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES,
ANNEXE BUILDING, JANPATH
 

friday 26th august
6.30 pm “Hindustani Classical Vocal” by Gaurav Sood

 

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august 6 saturday
6.30 pm “Sitar Melody” a sitar recital by Subho Chakraborty
with
Shubhas Kanti Das - tabla                            

Subho Chakraborty received Talim from Sri Prafulla Kumar Parbat, Pandit Debi Prosad Chatterjee and Pandit Partha Chatterjee. He also received vocal training from his mother Anju Chakraborty.

He is a regular artist of All India Radio & TV Kolkata.  He is an  empanelled artist of ICCR. He has received Suromani from Surshinger Samshad, Mumbai. He has performed in music conferences in Kolkata and performed in the IIC and Habitat Centre in New Delhi. He has also participated in the  Indo-Japan cultural meet  and has played background music in different films & serials.

 

tuesday 9th august
6.30 pm “Depression - the commonest major illness in the world” a talk by Dr Sanjay Chugh
 

Depression is reckoned to be the common cold of major illnesses worldwide. As opposed to Depression, Sadness is a part of being human, a natural reaction to painful circumstances. All of us will experience sadness at some point in our lives. Depression, however, is a biological or medical illness with many more symptoms than an unhappy mood. It is a very real and treatable illness and understanding the facts can save lives and decrease sickness or unhappiness in over a billion people in the world. 

Dr. Sanjay Chugh is a Senior Consultant Neuro-Psychiatrist. He completed his M.B.B.S. and then M.D. in Psychiatry in 1991. He has trained under and collaborated with leading practitioners and institutes of different specialities at a global level and is running his own private consultancy practice.  

His areas of specialization are Addiction Medicine , Ultra Rapid Detoxification from Drugs & Alcohol, Repetitive TMS, Past Life Regression Therapy & Hypnosis, Child and Adult Psychiatry.  

He writes for leading newspapers and magazines in India and is a participant on several television and radio channels in connection with mental health issues. 

 

friday 19 august
6.30 pm ‘Ghazals from Hyderabad’ by Anjali Gopalakrishnan

In the 14th century Mohammad Bin Tughlaq, ordered the entire population of Delhi to move to his new capital in the Deccan. Urdu (then called Hindavi) left Delhi only to return 300 years later and acquired a foothold south of the Vindhyas. The Bahmani, Adil Shahi and Qutab Shahi dynasties contributed to the growth and development of Indo-Persian and Indo-Islamic literature and culture in Hyderabad.

Urdu poetry from which Anjali draws her inspiration for her ghazals was also the inspiration for her guru Vithalraoji who used to perform in the Nizam's court in Hyderabad. He has composed the ghazals being sung this evening in a style of his own which does justice to the poetry on which they are based unlike many modern ghazal compositions. Music is a personal form of expression for Anjali, and she finds the subtleties and potential for interpretation involved in ghazal gayaki fascinating.

Her program will include ghazals written by Hyderabadi/Dakhni poets like Makhdoom Mohiuddin, Shaji, Wali Dakhni.

Anjali has masters' degrees in Physics from IIT Mumbai and Cornell. She was a teaching assistant at Harvard, and a high-school Physics teacher in Brooklyn, NY before she moved to India in 2005. She has been pursuing her interests in Indian vocal music more seriously since then. She is a student of Pt. Mani Prasad, a renowned vocalist of the Kirana Gharana as well as Pt. Vithal Rao, an eminent ghazal singer and    composer from Hyderabad. She is fortunate to have been associated with both her gurus since the time she was a child, when her mother was their student. Since moving to India, she has worked as a Consultant at the Institute for Studies in Industrial Development in Delhi, and as a marketing manager in Mumbai. Anjali passed the All India Radio audition in 2009 and has been singing ghazals for the Sugam Sangeet programs on AIR since then. 

Photo by Nayan Chanda at Anjali’s last performance at The Attic in august 2009 

 

august 20th saturday 
6.30 pm “Parithranam – the liberation” a Bharatanatyam performance by Renuka Iyer
  

The 63 Nayanars (or Nayanmars) were Shaivite devotional poets of Tamil Nadu, active between the fifth and the tenth centuries CE. (listed in the Tamil Śaiva hagiography Periya Puranam) 

Three of these Nandanar, Thillai Vettiyaan, and Perraan Saambhan were untouchables and earned liberation through their devotion to Nataraja of Chidambaram, the cosmic dancer. These 63 Shaivite and 12 Vaishnava Nayanars are important apostles of the rise of the Hindu Bhakti movement in South India. 

The journey of these saints was full of trials and tribulations. Renuka Iyer describes these through her dance leading to the ultimate liberation of the Saint Nandanar. She concludes her performance with a shloka on atmasmarpan by the Bhaktha, the essence of devotion. 

Renuka Iyer is an MA in Bharatanatyam from Gandharva Maha Vidhyalaya, Miraj and is studying law in Delhi. She is a graded artist of Delhi Doordarshan and has performed at the Navaratri cultural festival at Meenakshi Temple, Madurai, the ICCR and Delhi International Art Festival as well as the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games (for which many politicians are in jail) 

She performed at the ‘Festival of India’ in Spain, Portugal and Madeira Island with Guru Sonal Mansingh and in an international workshop of world classical music, dances and performing arts in ‘Académie musicale de Villecroze’, Nice, France.  Renuka is a  scholarship holder from CCRT, Ministry of Culture, Govt of India. 

sunday 21st august
1 to 2 pm Food Meditation # 16
 

 

Menu
Naurangi dal (ricebean)
Mixed seasonal vegetables
Brown rice
Chaulai chapatti (amaranth)
Chach (buttermilk)
Apples from Supi village (Kumaon)
 

 

Chach is a buttermilk made by separating the fat from the raw milk. This is done traditionally by a madhani (whipper). The butter which comes on top is filtered with a piece of cloth, and to the remaining milk-based liquid one adds salt, crushed and roasted cumin seeds to make a delicious cooling summer drink. This liquid has almost no fat content but contains all the good bacteria associated with yogurt and is one of the most healthy drinks.  The equivalent, lassi, also a cooling summer drink is made by mixing yogurt with water and flavouring (salt and cumin seeds, sugar, mango or other flavour) 

Naurangi daal is probably the least known and the best looking of the great Indian lentil family which includes arhar, toor, urad, chana, mung and many others. Grown in the lush hills of Kumaon and Garhwal, the very small multi coloured seeds of this plant are an aesthetic delight even before one starts cooking. Lentils (Daals) and Beans are a huge part of the Indian diet. Most meals include them not only are they delicious but extremely nutritious. Just one cup of cooked Daal can give you as much as 62 per cent of your daily dietary fibre and many important minerals like manganese, phosphorous, potassium, iron and copper. They are high in folates and the B-vitamins like Thiamin.  

Apples in India sometime in the late 19th century Capt. Scot of the British army planted apples in the Kullu Valley followed in the early 20th century by Samuel Stokes who planed in the Shimla area. The apples you are going to eat today are from the Supi village in the Kumaon hills. They are not the great commercial varieties sold all over India but not the poorer in flavour for that. 

The food will be eaten in silence.  

Participation is by registration on payment only. Call The Attic 23746050 or email:  mina@theatticdelhi.org.

Organized by Anaam, food cooked by Sangita.
Charges:  Rs 125.

  

Ancient Civilizations 

This Series of 12 lectures on the ancient civilizations of the world will be held at the National Archives over a 12 month period in collaboration with National Archives and UNESCO. 

Eminent Indian and foreign scholars will cover aspects of ancient India and the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, Mesopotamian and other ancient cultures. 

In the last 20 years many developments have taken place in the study of ancient civilizations. DNA, carbon dating and linguistic as well as reinterpretation of existing evidence by a new generation of scholars have overturned our dearly held beliefs of Aryan invasions and/or immigrations and point to a much older, indigenous civilization than previously thought.  

The Vedic Tradition probably influenced Egypt and Mesopotamia, the spread of Buddhism influenced cultural developments in S.E Asia, Tibet, China and Japan. Vedic Sanskrit still influences the Indo European cultures all over the world.  

This series introduces the views of newer scholars in the field with thought provoking, sometimes revolutionary ideas on our common past.

 

  

thursday 25th august
6 pm "The Origins of Early Greece: the Cretan Phase" by Dr Bharat Gupt 

AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES,
ANNEXE BUILDING, JANPATH
 

Greek civilization is best known to the world through its classical phase (5th to 2nd BC). Classical Greek culture had a powerful influence on the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of the Mediterranean region and Europe. Its architecture, drama, music, philosophy

and sciences produced the Renaissance of medieval Europe. Classical Greece is therefore generally considered to be the seminal culture which provided the foundation of Western civilization. 

The Minoan or the Cretan period lasted for around 1200 years from its earliest phase up to the 17th  century BC which transformed  into the later Classical culture.  

The Minoans seem through their art legacy as a prosperous, joyful and largely agrarian culture that imbibed technology and art from Egyptians and Asians and laid the foundations of Greek beliefs.  

The Cretan city planning, it seems was prototype of the classical Greek polis. Cretan pottery, painting, housing, sports and theater all seem to be seminal in the flowering of Greece and the West.

 Prof Gupt will show around a hundred slides based on objects preserved in the Heraklion Musuem and initiate a discussion on the ancient culture of the Mediterranean. 

Bharat Gupt, an Associate Professor in English at the College of Vocational Studies of the University of Delhi, is a classicist, theatre theorist, sitar and surbahar player, musicologist, cultural analyst, and newspaper columnist. He is trained in both, Western and traditional Indian educational systems. He was awarded the McLuhan Fellowship by University of Toronto, and the Senior Onasis Fellowship to research in Greece on classical Greek theatre. He has lectured extensively at Universities in India, North America, Europe, and Greece. He was a Visiting Professor to Greece and member of jury of the Onasis award for drama. He serves on the Visiting Faculty at the NSD, Delhi, and as resource scholar at the IGNCA and several other major centres and academies of the arts. His published books include: Dramatic Concepts Greek and Indian (1994), Natyasastra, Chapter 28: Ancient Scales of Indian Music (1996), Twelve Greek Poems into Hindi (2001), India: A Cultural Decline or Revival?(2008).

 

friday 26th august
6.30 pm “Hindustani Classical Vocal” by Gaurav Sood


Gaurav Sood has done Sangeet Visharad from Gandharva Mahavidyala and an M.A. in music from Delhi University. His M.Phil research was on rendition of Jayadeva Ashtpadi’s in the khayal style of the Gwalior tradition. He is presently researching for his doctorate on the role of music festivals in promoting  Hindustani classical music.

  A talented artist Gaurav possesses a melodious voice with a range for three octaves. His rendering of  Khayal, Tarana and Ashtapadi has a stamp of tradition plus his own innovation. As a Classical Vocalist he is a follower of the Gwalior Gharana and is presently under the tutelage of Guru Laxman Krishnarao Pandit, doyen of the Gwalior Gharana.

 

Tabla: Shri Sharad Patra
Harmonium: Arif Ali Khan